THE hero of Nick Hornby’s novel, “High Fidelity”, cannot get enough of vinyl records. By day Rob Fleming runs a record shop where he spends his time sampling the stock and constructing fantasy compilations with his equally obsessive assistants. By night he moons over his favourite songs. “Is it so wrong, wanting to be at home with your record collection?” he asks himself. “There’s a whole world in here, a nicer, dirtier, more violent, more peaceful, more colourful, sleazier, more dangerous, more loving world than the world I live in.”

Rob is an example of what management gurus dub “super-consumers”, “lead consumers” or “high-passion fans”. Only a tenth of customers are super-consumers but they account for 30-70% of sales, an even greater share of profits and almost 100% of “customer insights”, says a new book, “Super-Consumers”, written by Eddie Yoon of the Cambridge Group, a consultancy.

These people are not defined simply by the amount of stuff they buy (though they tend to be heavy users), but by their attitude to the product. Like Rob, they regard the things that they consume as answers to powerful…Continue reading